BJM Hall

Irmandade do Bom Jesus Milagroso

History

 Bom Jesus Milagroso History

Irmandade do Bom Jesus Milagroso do Estado da California, which means "Brotherhood of the Good Jesus of the State of California", derived it's name from the Festa do Bom Jesus that was celebrated at Ponta delgada in Madeira, Portugal.   It was founded in 1921 by 20 Portuguese immigrants from Madeira island.  These are the names of our founding fathers:

Francisco Castanho Antonio Andrade
Antonio de Silva Dias Manuel F. Jardim
Francisco Andre Pereira Manuel Gonsalves Cardoso
Antonio Ramos Rufino Gonsalves
Antonio Camara Manuel F. Ramos
Francisco G. Madeira Manuel Alexandre
Francisco G. Cardoso Joao de Andrade
Manuel Agostinho Silva Manuel Franco
Francisco Nunes Luis Camara
Francisco Quinta Antonio Rodrigues

  

Though the organization was founded in 1921, it was not incorporated until 3/31/1922.  On 4/22/1922 Mr. Joseph S. Dias sold the land where BJM is currently located to BJM for a $10 gold coin.  The are around  Ocean View drive was previously known as Homestead Park.   This original hall was a 2 story building with a dance floor on the top level and a dining hall on the bottom (basement) level.

In a terrible fire in 1978, the original hall burned down.  It took 3 years to rebuild the hall.  Members and community loaned (many times at 0% interest) and donated money to rebuild the current hall.  Members loaned $55,000 towards the construction of the new hall.   Contruction on the current hall started in 1980 and was finished in 1981.

Many memebrs refer to the BJM hall by it's Portuguese nickname "cabeco", which means "hill top".  While other members refer to it's English nickname "the hill".

 

The History of Madeira

Author: Amaro

In 1419, under the orders of the Glorious Henry "The Navigator", it was discovered by João Gonçalves Zarco and Tristão Vaz Teixeira. The kingdom had a constant lack of cereals, so they wanted to provide it with it and also be supportive to the maritime expansion of Portugal.

Thus, since the 15th century, Madeira has played an important role on the great Portuguese Discoveries. It became also famous for the rich trade routes between Funchal and the entire Atlantic World.

It was also in Madeira and Porto Santo that the merchant Cristovão Colombo (Christopher Columbus) increased his knowledge of the art of navigation and planned his famous voyage to America.

In 1425, after the division of the Archipelago into captaincies of Funchal, Machico and Porto Santo began the organised settlement. During some decades, cereal production was a factor of richness and development. At that time, Madeira had about 150 big farms that produced more than 3.000 m³ of wheat, being great part exported to the Mainland and to the Portuguese trading post of the Saccharine and Guinea Littoral.

In 1497 the island's population had reached 5,000. Madeira was formally annexed into the Kingdom of Portugal, Funchal was declared the islands' capital (elevated to the rank of a city in 1508).

Wine and sugarcane (1425) were introduced, Madeira being where the world's first sugarcane plantation was established. The sugar industry made the islands prosperous, a prosperity which lasted until the Portuguese introduced sugarcane plantations to Sao Tome and then to Brazil – in both cases utilizing Madeiran experience and manpower (emigration). Then, out shadowed by Brazilian sugar exports, the Madeiran economy declined.

The Madeira Diogo Teives invented the first mechanical sugar mill moved by water. This invention determinated a great increase of production, which in 1506 reached 3.500 tones.

Madeira had its greatest economical and cultural development during this period and became known all over the civilised World.

In 1516 Funchal was declared seat of a bishop.

In 1640, Madeira had c.30,000 inhabitants.

In 1580 Portugal and Madeira became under the domain of Castille. However, in 1640, the independence was restored, followed by the marriage of our Infant D. Catarina de Bragança with Charles II of England. It was then granted several contracts with British people who favoured the exportation of Madeira Wine to England, Occidental India and British colonies in America. Since the last decade of the 17th century, Madeira knew a new period of economical and cultural increasing, being its excellent wine responsible for the fame of the Island all over the world.

Quickly the production achieved 45.000 wine barrels, from which annually were exported a medium of 30.000. This prosperity called vineyard cycle had its reflections at arts and architecture.

In 1766, Madeira gained the right to mint coins. Slavery was abolished in 1775, by Portugal's strongman Marquis de Pombal, this caused difficulties for the Madeiran plantation economy.

In the 1850es, embroidery was introduced, an industry which soon added to the islands' revenues. The first tourists visited the island, and Madeira wine continued to enjoy a high reputation.

According to a census of 1891, Madeira had 132,223 inhabitants. Around the turn of the century, the banana was introduced as an additional crop.

In 1901, Madeira was granted a limited degree of autonomy.

In 1926, Portugal was turned into a corporate state similar to that of Italy. The strongman was Antonio Salazar.

In World War II, Portugal remained neutral. The dictatorship in Portugal continued until after Salazar's death; only in 1974 was it overthrown by the military coup.

The 1974 coup brought Portugal democratization; its colonies were quickly released into independence. The Madeira Islands, Portuguese since 1420, remained with Portugal and were granted far-reaching political autonomy.

In addition to the Portuguese national flag, Madeira has its own regional flag. The blue part symbolizes the sea surrounding the island and the yellow represents the abundance from the luxuriance. The red and white cross in the middle is identical to the one on the flag of Prince Henry's ships.

 Portugal's entry into the EEC was a major benefit for Madeira's economy. In recent years, the tourism industry expanded, becoming the islands' prime source of revenue.

Nowadays, with both the airport and port expansion and road/tunnel construction connecting all regions, industrial tourism developed. Madeira is known all over the world by the diversity of its splendours beauty, splendid climate and above all, by the excellent quality of tourist services and population kindness.

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In 1419, under the orders of the Glorious Henry "The Navigator", it was discovered by João Gonçalves Zarco and Tristão Vaz Teixeira. The kingdom had a constant lack of cereals, so they wanted to provide it with it and also be supportive to the maritime expansion of Portugal. Christopher Columbus house

Thus, since the 15th century, Madeira has played an important role on the great Portuguese Discoveries. It became also famous for the rich trade routes between Funchal and the entire Atlantic World.

It was also in Madeira and Porto Santo that the merchant Cristovão Colombo (Christopher Columbus) increased his knowledge of the art of navigation and planned his famous voyage to America.

In 1425, after the division of the Archipelago into captaincies of Funchal, Machico and Porto Santo began the organised settlement. During some decades, cereal production was a factor of richness and development. At that time, Madeira had about 150 big farms that produced more than 3.000 m³ of wheat, being great part exported to the Mainland and to the Portuguese trading post of the Saccharine and Guinea

 

In 1497 the island's population had reached 5,000. Madeira was formally annexed into the Kingdom of Portugal, Funchal was declared the islands' capital (elevated to the rank of a city in 1508).

Wine and sugarcane (1425) were introduced, Madeira being where the world's first sugarcane plantation was established. The sugar industry made the islands prosperous, a prosperity which lasted until the Portuguese introduced sugarcane plantations to Sao Tome and then to Brazil – in both cases utilizing Madeiran experience and manpower (emigration). Then, out shadowed by Brazilian sugar exports, the Madeiran economy declined.

The Madeira Diogo Teives invented the first mechanical sugar mill moved by water. This invention determinated a great increase of production, which in 1506 reached 3.500 tones.

Madeira had its greatest economical and cultural development during this period and became known all over the civilised World.

 

In 1516 Funchal was declared seat of a bishop.

In 1640, Madeira had c.30,000 inhabitants.

In 1580 Portugal and Madeira became under the domain of Castille. However, in 1640, the independence was restored, followed by the marriage of our Infant D. Catarina de Bragança with Charles II of England. It was then granted several contracts with British people who favoured the exportation of Madeira Wine to England, Occidental India and British colonies in America. Since the last decade of the 17th century, Madeira knew a new period of economical and cultural increasing, being its excellent wine responsible for the fame of the Island all over the world.

Quickly the production achieved 45.000 wine barrels, from which annually were exported a medium of 30.000. This prosperity called vineyard cycle had its reflections at arts and architecture.

In 1766, Madeira gained the right to mint coins. Slavery was abolished in 1775, by Portugal's strongman Marquis de Pombal, this caused difficulties for the Madeiran plantation economy.

In the 1850es, embroidery was introduced, an industry which soon added to the islands' revenues. The first tourists visited the island, and Madeira wine continued to enjoy a high reputation.

According to a census of 1891, Madeira had 132,223 inhabitants. Around the turn of the century, the banana was introduced as an additional crop.

In 1901, Madeira was granted a limited degree of autonomy.

In 1926, Portugal was turned into a corporate state similar to that of Italy. The strongman was Antonio Salazar.

In World War II, Portugal remained neutral. The dictatorship in Portugal continued until after Salazar's death; only in 1974 was it overthrown by the military coup.

The 1974 coup brought Portugal democratization; its colonies were quickly released into independence. The Madeira Islands, Portuguese since 1420, remained with Portugal and were granted far-reaching political autonomy.

In addition to the Portuguese national flag, Madeira has its own regional flag. The blue part symbolizes the sea surrounding the island and the yellow represents the abundance from the luxuriance. The red and white cross in the middle

    


Contact Information

 

21160 Ocean View Drive

Hayward, CA 94541

BJMoffice@gmail.com

 

510-581-4034

 

We Speak:

English, Spanish, Portuguese

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